News for Public Officials and the People They Serve

 

America's Loneliest Counties

Stories and Stats from The Least Populated Most Remote Rural Counties in the US

 

Least Populated Counties in Texas

Loving County TX
King County TX
Kenedy County TX
Borden County TX
McMullen County TX
Kent County TX
Roberts County TX
Terrell County TX
Motley County TX
Sterling County TX
Glasscock County TX
Foard County TX
Stonewall County TX
Cottle County TX
Briscoe County TX
Throckmorton County TX
Irion County TX
Edwards County TX
Armstrong County TX
Oldham County TX
Menard County TX
Jeff Davis County TX
Culberson County TX
Dickens County TX

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Famous People from Cottle County, Texas including Clarence Hailey Long, Maury Bray and William S Heatly.
 

Clarence Hailey Long the rugged Texas cowboy sensationalized as the original Marlboro Man. Born January 9, 1910 in Paducah Texas he was the  foreman of the JA Ranch in 1949 when he gained national attention when LIFE magazine published a series of photographs on ranching in the American West. Long was the basis of the popular Marlboro cigarettes advertising campaign for Philip Morris . . . read more

   

   

 

The First Marlboro Man
Maury Bray, American football offensive tackle who played two seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National Football League. He played college football at Southern Methodist University.
William S Heatly usually known as W. S. "Bill" Heatly was a Democratic member of the Texas House of Representatives who served from 1955 to 1983. Known as the "Duke of Paducah", a reference to his hometown of Paducah, the county seat of Cottle County, Heatly wielded significant political power during his tenure in office.
 
Samuel Nathaniel Morris -  head of the Voice of Temperance radio broadcast

Samuel Nathaniel Morris was born March 6, 1900 in Paducah, Texas. His father had left his mother with two small children two months before Sam was born, and she went to live with her parents on their farm near Paducah. By the time Sam was seven years old both his grandparents had died and his mother supported herself and the three children by taking in washing. He did not see his father until he was nine years old. Later, his parents re-married. His father farmed a little, ran a saw mill, and operated a tie camp. The children worked like grownups. They lived in shacks, tents and covered wagons. They never went to church or school. From the time his father came back until he left again in 1919, they were constantly on the move in Texas or Oklahoma, from one place to another, moving sometimes just across the farm and sometimes across the state. They were always in debt, always on the move, always embarrassed . . .

 

 
 

Data Sources:

US Census Bureau

National Association of Counties

Wikipedia People

 

 

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